Healthy Skin Starts from Within

Healthy Skin Starts from Within

External indicators such as paws, nails, skin, and coats can be used to assess your pet’s health. It could be an indication that your pet needs nutritional support if they have brittle paws, nails, dry itchy skin, or if their coat has lost its sheen and sheds regularly.

Instead of reaching for a new shampoo or treatment, consider how you may help your pet’s skin and coat from the inside out. Excessive grooming can do more harm than good. Washing removes the oils that hydrate and protect the skin.

Excessive grooming might alter the microbiota of the skin and make it more vulnerable to irritants. Instead, concentrate on giving them the nutrition they require to build strong tissues, resulting in a healthier pet on the inside and exterior.

The Right Amount of Fatty Acids

funny adorable spaniel dog on green lawn
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Healthy fats must be included in a dog’s diet. Many commercial dog foods, unfortunately, do not supply enough beneficial fats. Fish oils, olive oil, flaxseed oil, and lecithin are excellent options.

They’re high in Omega-3 and Omega-6 fatty acids, which help to prevent rashes and hot spots by reducing inflammation and irritation. By holding in moisture and keeping out irritants that cause dry, itchy skin, omega-3 increases the skin’s protective barrier.

Providing your pet with healthy fats accelerates wound healing by supplying critical fatty acids and vitamins that tissues require to renew. There will be reduced shedding and a nicer coat. Olive oil and flaxseed oil both contain antioxidants that can help your pet’s skin age gracefully.

Vitamin A for Nourished Skin

Vitamin A is necessary for skin that is smooth and revitalized. Vitamin A deficiency causes skin to become itchy, dry, and scaly since it is required for the body to produce sebum. Sebum is an oily fluid secreted by the skin that keeps the skin and coats moisturized and lustrous. Hair loss is caused by low amounts of Vitamin A, thus a healthy coat necessitates enough daily intake.

Vitamin D3 for Hair Follicles

selective focus photo of a curious black and white dog
Photo by Karolina Grabowska on Pexels.com

Vitamin D3 is essential for a healthy coat since it aids in the formation of new hair follicles. Fur becomes brittle and growth slows when there isn’t enough Vitamin D. When looking for a Vitamin D supplement, D3 is preferred over D2 because it is more easily absorbed.

Vitamin E for Collagen

Collagen fibers are formed with the help of vitamin E. Collagen is essential for a healthy coat and skin since it is involved in the growth and formation of hair and skin. For this reason, vitamin E is well-known for improving scars and tissue healing. Vitamin E also helps to keep skin, nails, paws, and coats moisturized.

Silica for Skin Strength

In your pet’s body, silica is one of the most plentiful trace minerals. It’s a popular hair, nail, and skin supplement in the health and beauty business, and it can also help your pet. Silica is required for the production of collagen and enzymes, which help to maintain skin suppleness and strength.

Collagen is a protein that is found in a variety of tissues, including hair, nails, skin, bones, cartilage, and tendons. Hair loss is reduced and fur is shinier when you eat a silica-rich diet. Your pet’s nails and paws will be stronger and healthier as well.

Keep Your Dog Nourished

Strong joints, ligaments, and muscles, enhanced eyesight, increased brain health, improved wound healing, and good digestion are just a few of the many other health-promoting benefits you’ll see when you feed your pet healthy fats, vitamins, and minerals. And, of course, a healthier, more luminous skin and coat!

Read More:

A prospective, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled evaluation of the effects of eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid on the clinical signs and erythrocyte membrane polyunsaturated fatty acid concentrations in dogs with osteoarthritis

Effects of feeding a high omega-3 fatty acids diet in dogs with naturally occurring osteoarthritis

Effect of a diet enriched with green-lipped mussel on pain behavior and functioning in dogs with clinical osteoarthritis

A randomized, double-blind, prospective, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy of a diet supplemented with curcuminoids extract, hydrolyzed collagen and green tea extract in owner’s dogs with osteoarthritis

Undenatured type II collagen mitigates inflammation and cartilage degeneration in healthy Labrador Retrievers during an exercise regimen

Published by AmberLDrake

Dr. Drake is an award-winning author and well-known cancer specialist in her field. She is best known for her extensive research on canine cancer prevention and nutrition, her dedication to help dogs live a long, happy life, and for teaching veterinary medicine. As the CEO of Canine Companions Co., the Founder of Drake Dog Cancer Foundation and Academy, and the Co-Founder of Preferable Pups, in addition to being a respected figure in the dog world, she has earned the respect of thousands of dog lovers worldwide.

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